Good Practices: Teacher Training Materials

PARRISE TPD courses at CUT

This TPD adopts a model of teachers as learners, designers, innovators and reflective practitioners. As part of this TPD teachers are divided and are asked to work in different design groups, organized according to discipline and level of teaching (e.g. primary, lower secondary or upper secondary education). The main goal of the TPD is to introduce and familiarize teachers to the PARRISE approach and support teachers in co-designing and implementing their own SSIBL modules. The TPD also includes the classroom implementations, during which the teachers have the opportunities to implement and evaluate their SSIBL modules.
PARRISE primary science teachers group discussing
PARRISE chemistry teachers present their poster
PARRISE primary science teachers’ meeting

The TPD course is composed of 11 sessions: 5 Face-to-Face sessions (F2F) and 6 online sessions.

This TPD expands during a typical school year (e.g. September-June) and adopts a model of teachers as learners, designers, innovators and reflective practitioners. As part of this TPD teachers are divided and are asked to work in different design groups, organized according to discipline and level of teaching (e.g. primary, lower secondary or upper secondary education). This TPD also includes the classroom implementations, during which the teachers can act as innovators through implementing and evaluating their SSIBL modules.

The main goal of the TPD is to introduce and familiarize teachers to the PARRISE approach as well as to support teachers in co-designing and implementing their own SSIBL modules.

This TPD approach combines experiential learning, occurring during five face-to-face meetings, co-design meetings (mainly online meetings), and continuous reflection activities. Four main aspects of the TPD serve as the main mechanisms for supporting the TPD processes: experiential learning, co-design, the opportunity to enact and assess the effectiveness of the SSIBL implementations, and continuous opportunities for reflection.

The TPD courses addressed 7 main objectives, as follows:

O1. Understand the essential aspects of the SSIBL framework and be able to discern and explain the differences of this approach as compared to other pedagogical approaches. [Teachers as learners]

O2. Analyse existing science modules according to each of the components of the SSIBL framework [Teachers as learners]

O3. Identify science modules from their national curriculum, which can be adapted according to the SSIBL framework [Teachers as learners and as reflective practitioners]

O4. Adapt or develop short and extended SSIBL activities for their own classroom [Teachers as designers]

O5. Implement SSIBL‐based activities in their science classrooms [Teachers as reflective practitioners]

O6. Evaluate the success of the implementation of the SSIBL activities [Teachers as reflective practitioners]

O7. Report and reflect on the challenges of the SSIBL framework in relation to: (a) understanding the framework, (b) adapting existing activities to address the SSIBL framework, and c) implementing the SSIBL framework with students. [Teachers as reflective practitioners]

As part of the TPD evaluation, we addressed the following questions:

Q1: To what extent do the learning materials developed by the teachers address the SSIBL pillars?

Q3: What is the impact of the SSIBL-based student materials, developed by the disciplinary teacher groups, on students’ motivation and active citizenship dispositions?

Q4: What is the impact of the TPD, on teachers’ confidence to implement the SSIBL framework?

Our findings were positive for all the evaluation questions posed, ensuring the efficiency of the proposed TPD model.

08/03/2018

European Commission

PARRISE (grant agreement 612438) is a four year programme (2014-2017) funded by the European Commission.

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